I'll be taking this test tomorrow. As what Migs said, this calmed (me) down a bit, too. Thanks.

Understanding College Entrance Test Results Besides “Passed”

The late Randy Pausch said “The brick walls aren’t there to keep us out.  They’re there to show us how badly we really want something.  The brick walls are there to stop the people who don’t want it badly enough.”  Perhaps the same could be said of entrance exam results, too.

Let’s face it:  as much as we’d like to see an unequivocal “PASSED” in big bold letters on our college entrance tests, that doesn’t always happen, in spite of our best efforts.  Even if you should encounter one of the following results, it’s not the end of the world.

Passed…Sort of

Sometimes, we get “conditional” passing results in the form of being waitlisted (aka degree course with available slot in U.P.), placed on pending status, placed on academic placement (UST) or being qualified for a sister campus.

If you should encounter any of these, know that you can still do something to rectify the situation.  Have you been waitlisted?  You may want to take another course in the meantime and then shift to your first course of choice once a slot becomes available.  Got a pending status?  Work out the kinks with the university admissions office and submit any missing documents.

Have you been qualified for a course other than the one you wanted (academic placement) or a sister branch of the university?  There are several things you can do:  you could simply bite the bullet and settle for an alternative program or campus that’s available, or you can try reapplying at your college of choice during the following year.  Another option is to try appealing to school authorities (Please see the Final Advice section below.).

Closed Doors…for Now

If, God forbid, you end up not qualifying for anything at all, then don’t despair.  It could mean that you’re either not meant to attend that university, or you’re not meant to attend it yet.

In that case, you may wish to consider attending another college for now, and then transferring back to your original university of choice after you’ve earned a certain number of units.  The rules and requirements differ from school to school, so be sure to check with the one you’ll be attending in the meantime and the one you’d originally wanted to attend.

Final Advice

Regardless of what results you get, the school you applied to will usually provide you with a list of instructions telling you what your options are and what you need to do next.  Keep calm, clear your mind, read through the instructions and follow them to the letter.

If you think you deserve another chance, then find out if your university accepts applications for reconsideration and then go for it.  Mistakes do happen, and sometimes a perfectly student is denied entry due to human error.  Who knows?  An appeal may be all you need to get school officials to change their minds about you.

In closing, I leave you with this:  it may hurt to not get what you want now, yet someday you’ll be able to look back on the disappointment and see how God worked everything out for the good.  Human hindsight is usually much clearer in that respect, so trust Him and never give up.

Types of UPCAT Results

The best type of UPCAT result is of course the one that says accepted.  Sadly, this is also the rarest one.  If you do get this kind of result, shout the news over the rooftops, offer some eggs to the monastery or treat yourself out.  You deserve it.

The Results You Don’t Expect (Or Don’t Want to Expect)

While everyone’s goal is to make it into the state university, the sad fact is that not everyone gets the results they work hard to achieve.  The most painful one is obviously a flat out “no,” yet sometimes you get a “special” kind of result that’s somewhere between full acceptance and utter rejection.

The first special case you may come across is known as the pending status.  It’s classified as an “almost there but not quite” status—in other words, the potential student appears to have all the necessary qualifications for acceptance, except for a wee hitch or two.

The hitch usually has something to do with documents or some other requirements that the potential pupil has turned in.  Never fear, as the Admissions Office will explain the situation to the applicant, as well as what can be done about it.  Once things have been settled, the student is good to go.

Another case you may encounter is that of the “degree course with available slot” status.  In layman’s terms, it means that the student hopeful has been waitlisted with respect to his or her first course of choice.

Waitlisted?  Now What?

Fortunately, there are alternatives available.  For one thing, applicants may pray and choose to wait for a slot to appear as far as their first choice is concerned.  If they’re really hot about studying in U.P. right away, regardless of course, they may also settle for their second choice, instead.

On a related note, the university may suggest that the students go for a “non-quota course” while they wait.  I placed the phrase in between quotation marks because word apparently has it that U.P. no longer makes the distinction between quota and non-quota programs—every course is supposedly now a quota course.

If ever you decide to take that path, do know that you can always opt to shift to your first choice if or when a slot becomes available, unless you change your mind and stay in your non-quota course for the rest of your college tenure.

Yet another thing you can do is to try appealing to the school authorities.  They may actually reconsider.  Believe me, there have actually been cases of that happening.  University officials aren’t perfect, and sometimes a second look is all that’s needed for them to change their minds.

Regardless of what exam result you end up with, remember, there’s always a positive way to respond to your situation.  Find out what can be done and what your options are, pray for wisdom and guidance, and then decide and move forward.

To learn about other alternatives in case you dont pass the UPCAT, click here.