Really nice post! My kid will be taking this year’s UPKAT. Thank you for sharing some tips. Hope to hear more from parents of past UPKAT takers. God bless and happy weekend everyone.

An ACET Sample Essay and Some Tips


Perhaps the thing that Ateneo applicants dread the most, next to Mathematics, is the prospect of writing an essay.  Unfortunately, if you’re interested in an Ateneo education, you’ll be eating essays for breakfast lunch and dinner.  The time to start preparing for that is right now—before you even take the Ateneo College Entrance Test (ACET).

To help out, I’ve included a sample ACET essay for you, coupled with some notes and guidelines for study.  Please note that you do not have to write your essay in exactly this way; this is just a reference to help you get started.  You will naturally have your own writing style and approach to things.

The Sample Essay

The following sample is a treatise on the topic of frustration—something you’re likely to experience at least once when you’re interacting with peers from all walks of like in an academic institution known for its high standards.  I’ve also included some footnotes on points I felt I needed to emphasize:

Coping Effectively with the “F” Word[1]

A wise person once told me that oftentimes, it’s not the big problems that trip us up the most, but the many, many little annoyances that come in battalions.[2] It’s because of the fact that they’re “little” that they often escape our immediate notice—at least until they pile up and grate on our patience.

Fortunately, I’ve experienced frustration enough times that I’ve learned to deal with it more effectively than before, or to at least minimize its damaging effects.  Perhaps the following guidelines may help you, too.

The Three-Minute Rule[3]

Chances are, the first thing that pops into your head when you’re frustrated is not the right thing to do or say.  That’s why it’s very important to take some time off for what is known as the “Three-Minute Rule.”[4]

The rule basically dictates that when you start to feel frustrated, back off or at least three minutes to get some much needed perspective on the situation.  Take the time to pray and to seek guidance and wisdom.

Note that three minutes is an arbitrary span time.  It may be three minutes, three hours, or three days.  The important thing is to let your emotions cool down sufficiently to the point where you can think clearly again, and then act.

Look for the Unorthodox Alternative

A story is told of Alexander the Great undertaking the challenge of untying the Gordian Knot.[5] The knot was said to have been tied in such a complex manner that no one was able to untie it.

The shrewd Alexander, however, simply drew his sword and cut the knot, effectively untying it.  Since then, the expression “cutting the Gordian Knot” has come to mean solving a complex problem using unique and ingenious means.

Like Alexander, see if you can find another way to solve your problem instead of pursuing a course of action that just doesn’t work.[6] For example, if you can’t get through an obstacle, perhaps you can go around it somehow.

The Need to Let Go

One question that inspirational speakers and writers like to ask themselves is if something will still be worth fussing over ten, fifty, or even one hundred years from now.  Chances are, the thing that’s causing you so much frustration right now may not even be important next year.  If so, are you perhaps giving it more attention than it is really worth?

One lesson that the late inspirational writer Richard Carlson[7] left me is the choice of being right or being happy.  We mistakenly think that we will only be happy if we prove ourselves right and everyone else wrong, or if we nail that difficult problem and show everyone what we’ve accomplished.

Some things are simply not worth your peace of mind.  Sometimes, it’s better to swallow your pride and to make a strategic withdrawal instead of forcing the issue at the time.  As Dr. Harold Sala once quipped, “Any bear can easily whip a skunk, but it’s just not worth it.”[8]


A Final Word

The essay I’ve included above is just one example of many.  You can find more examples and guidelines online if ever you need more reference material.  Here is a short list to help you get started:

Xavier School High 4 – This blog contains a sample essay and some excellent pointers

Ateneo Tribute Essays – While not exactly application essays, it may also help to study the essays on the Ateneo site.  The ones here deal with the passing of former President Cory Aquino.

A Winning Contest Essay – Here’s the essay that won the “Rizal na, Europa Pa,” essay contest for Mr. Joaquin Carlos de Jesus.

Peer Papers – If you have some money to invest, try reading the essays on this site. You’ll notice the names of some famous Ateneans here, too.

Finally, remember that essay-writing is an applied skill—like all skills, it may be developed through constant practice.  The good news is that the more you practice creating essays, the more you’ll be able to refine your technique and develop a unique style and a voice all your own.


[1] The title is the first thing your readers will look at, so try to make it catchy and hook them in with it.

[2] It helps to start off your essay with something attention-grabbing. In my case, I opted for “a saying of the wise.”

[3] If your essay is fairly long, using captions or headings to break it up into segments helps.

[4] Whenever you mention something that may be unfamiliar to your reader, take the time to explain it. Don’t leave your readers scratching their heads in confusion.

[5] Stories are great for getting your point across in an engaging manner. Besides, people love them.

[6] If you’re going to tell a story, choose one that’s somehow related to the message you’re trying to communicate. That way, it’s easier to link your story to your point.

[7] Quoting, paraphrasing or simply drawing stuff from famous personalities can help lend credence to your essay.

[8] If you start your essay with a bang, end it with a bang as well. Audiences tend to recall the beginning and the end of your presentation most clearly, so save your best for first and last.

Disclaimer

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Academic-Clinic.com has been established to provide students and their parents an additional source of timely and relevant information.  It is not meant to serve as nor claim to be a replacement for the information portals of universities, schools, government agencies, private organizations, and any other entities we may have used as references.

Please be advised. Thank you.

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5 thoughts on “An ACET Sample Essay and Some Tips

  1. Pingback: UPCAT Essay Writing to Be Part of UPCAT 2013

  2. The site is very helpful particularly on the tips, strategies for taking college entrance exams. Thank you very much. Keep up the good work. Good job to the developers of this site.

  3. Pingback: What to Expect from the Ateneo College Entrance Test or ACET | Academic-Clinic

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